Progressive Overload and Periodisation

Progressive overload and periodised programming are something that perhaps gets mentioned more in athletic/elite performance, but in our opinion it should be a key factor in all programming for all groups and individuals. Why? Progressive overload is important because it helps you to consistently make progress. As you dive deeper into over-training, you’ll realise that it isn’t always about lifting heavier weights, sometimes it’s about pushing yourself harder, doing more reps, more sets, adding bands, resting more, or recovering faster. One of the easiest ways to add progressive overload to your training is to add more weight or resistance every time you train. For example if you are looking to increase your vertical jump, add a sandbag to your back, try doing box jumps with light dumbbells in your hands. If your main goal is to build strength overtime for specific lifts, then add a few more kgs to your lifts every time you train. Although this may prove impossible to maintain overtime, it’s still something you should consider trying while at a manageable weight. If you’re experiencing a plateau in your training then the best way to progressively overload is to not add more weight, but to add more volume. This would still challenge you, but would be more achievable than the intensity of adding more weight.


Progressive overload and periodised programming are something that perhaps gets mentioned more in athletic/elite performance, but in our opinion it should be a key factor in all programming for all groups and individuals. Why? Progressive overload is important because it helps you to consistently make progress. As you dive deeper into over-training, you’ll realise that it isn’t always about lifting heavier weights, sometimes it’s about pushing yourself harder, doing more reps, more sets, adding bands, resting more, or recovering faster. One of the easiest ways to add progressive overload to your training is to add more weight or resistance every time you train. For example if you are looking to increase your vertical jump, add a sandbag to your back, try doing box jumps with light dumbbells in your hands. If your main goal is to build strength overtime for specific lifts, then add a few more kgs to your lifts every time you train. Although this may prove impossible to maintain overtime, it’s still something you should consider trying while at a manageable weight. If you’re experiencing a plateau in your training then the best way to progressively overload is to not add more weight, but to add more volume. This would still challenge you, but would be more achievable than the intensity of adding more weight.


Periodisation is an amalgamation of two important concepts: The progressive overload principle and the general adaptation syndrome. The progressive overload principal recognizes that physical improvement occurs when the body is forced to adapt to increased stress. When you increase the load on your barbell or the speed on the treadmill, you pump up the intensity of your exercise routine and thereby also improve your strength, power and endurance. But that doesn’t mean that every workout you do needs to be more intense than the last. On the contrary, human progress is never linear. This is where the general adaptation syndrome comes into play. The rule of general adaptation recognizes that after an initial growth phase, the body tends to become somewhat stale and inured to improvement. It also becomes more susceptible to injury. Periodization accommodates these down cycles by bringing an element of science and planning into exercise variation. It’s not just a matter of taking a break now and then. Rather, it’s a progressive regime that cycles through the various facets of conditioning in a deliberate sequence – one that’s calculated to maximize yearly gains and achieve peak performance at a predetermined time. How do you see this with our training? First off, our performance studio training is mapped out in 10 week macrocycles, with designated benchmarks and rest weeks. The goal of these cycles is to improve fitness across multiple parameters including:


V02 max (Cardio fitness)

·Strength

·Muscular Endurance

·Flexibility/Mobility

·Power (Speed at Strength)

·Agility


Within these sessions we are constantly driving you to lift heavier, increase the volume of your training, our rest breaks and work time decrease/increase, the intensity of the exercises increases, as does the skill levels and movement patterns. Looking to increase your calories burnt or Intensity points gained on you heart rate monitor. This is progressive overload. The key with progressive overload is that much of it is INTRINSIC, you need to push yourself harder, make that commitment to yourself to push harder when you can, but also to REST. And let's not forget rest, without adequate rest and recovery you will start to feel symptoms of over training. This is where you feel you are stuck at a plateau you can’t break through, low of energy. Sore and tried. Practicing yoga, pilates, Sauna and regular massage can be the aid to break through. While we have a designated DeLoad/Recovery week in programming, ensure you are making time weekly for you own recovery and rest.

Are you #downshifting?


Happy Training

Jimmy




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